Pucks and Tweets: An Example of Speaking Your Audience’s Language

As both a hockey fan and PR practitioner, I have been fascinated by what the Los Angeles Kings have been doing this spring. Not only have they won on the ice, but they are also creating buzz off of it through social media. How have they done this? By knowing their target audience and speaking its language.

The Kings, through their Twitter feed, wanted to go beyond an information feed of box scores and event notifications that the medium is traditionally used for by sports teams. They wanted to be more engaging and interactive with their audience. To do this, the Kings decided to develop their own voice that reflected their target audience, being snarky and sarcastic similar to that of a fan.

“At the end of the day, we aren’t saying anything groundbreaking — we’re just saying things you wouldn’t normally hear from an ‘official’ team account. And that’s really the difference; we’re using Twitter exactly as it was intended — to interact with our fanbase. Social media is a two-way conversation and Twitter, specifically, is designed for great one-liners that can be shared and re-tweeted. All we’re doing is injecting a little personality into @LAKings.”
–Dewayne Hankins, director of digital media for the Los Angeles Kings

Since the beginning of the playoffs the Kings twitter feed has grown by more than 30,000 followers to over 100,000.

The Kings approach of knowing the audience you want to reach and speaking its language is a lesson for all. Brands need to take this approach into account not just for social media, but for all messaging. It doesn’t need to be snarky and sarcastic like the Kings, but it does need to be reflective of the audience that you are trying to reach. Speaking your audience’s language means stronger connections with your audience and greater brand value.

As Hankings said about the Kings Twitter feed, “It’s an extension of the brand.”

They are now in the Stanley Cup Finals, and I can’t wait to see what the Kings tweet next.

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